More and more Conservatives leaving the door open to a People’s Vote - People's Vote

More and more Conservatives leaving the door open to a People’s Vote

Far from shoring up Conservative support for No Deal or a vicious Brexit, Boris Johnson’s tactic of deploying draconian discipline against dissident voices in his party has only served to make a growing number of Tories open to – or even to explicitly back – a People’s Vote as the only democratic route out of the Brexit crisis.

In the last 48 hours, Ken Clarke – a man who has spent 50 years opposing referendums – has joined Amber Rudd and David Gauke in saying that a final say referendum could be a legitimate way out of the Brexit crisis, while last week Anne Milton and Antoinette Sandbach went further and explicitly advocated a confirmatory referendum to bring closure to the Brexit process.

And before that Philip Hammond, the former Chancellor, acknowledged that a People’s Vote was a legitimate solution to the ongoing political gridlock.

Today People’s Vote is launching a new video to highlight the words of Clarke, Gauke and Rudd and is urging the still significant number of Conservative voters who back a final say referendum to come on the campaign’s 19 October march and to write to their MP urging them to support a People’s Vote ahead of any general election – as a means both of uniting the country and of healing the wounds in the Conservative Party by bringing closure to the often toxic Brexit debate before it dominates any election campaign.

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Notes to editors:

The video can be seen at: https://twitter.com/peoplesvote_uk/status/1177218548449591297

On Monday Ken Clarke said: “If you had to have a referendum to validate the Withdrawal Agreement or decide what the alternatives are if we don’t, I might resign myself to that.”

Yesterday David Gauke told Channel 4 News: “And the point I would make to a lot of my Conservative, perhaps I should say my former Conservative, colleagues is that if they don’t back a deal then there plainly is a move towards a second referendum”.

And Amber Rudd told Robert Peston: “Better? Probably yes … Probably better than a general election because my concern is that a general election wouldn’t resolve anything.”